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british law. >>> the asian development bank has raised this year's outlook for five emerging economies. its board members cite strong growth in southeast asia, especially in the philippines and malaysia. the bank's board members revised their estimate from 5.6% in october to 5.9%. the five countries are the philippines, malaysia, indonesia, thailand, and vietnam. the bank official said third-quarter expansion in the philippines was high at 7.1%. they said rising consumption and public investment in malaysia is contributing to the region's growth. the story was different for japan. they lowered their 2012 growth estimate by 0.6 percentage points. they cited a drop in exports stemming from a territorial dispute with china. the bank officials say southeast asian economies are supported by solid domestic demand. they added the countries are relatively unaffected by the debt woes in europe. >>> as if to back up the ad bcs's projection, japan's economy remained out of steam in october. the latest key economic indicator fell for the seventh straight month. the cabinet office says the coincide
minutes away. count do countdown is on. the economy probably added about 80,000 jobs last month. reuters consensus is a little higher at 93,000. the unemployment rate expected to hold steady at 7.9% and economists say the slow down in nonfarm payrolls will reflect the effect of sandy. joining us this hour is bank of america merrill lynch global research senior research economist michelle mire and we'll talk through everything that's been happening through jobs and what to expect. but first, there is a developing story. an earthquake off the northeast coast of japan triggered a tsunami warning. the warning has been lifted, but it was a 7.3 quake. so far no reports of any injuries or damage. it was for the same area devastated by an earthquake and tsunami back in march of last year. we will continue to bring you any developments. in the meantime, steve has some of the morning's top other stories. >> let's start with the markets. asian stocks rallying to 2012 highs overnight. the nikkei edging lower after hitting a se hitting hitting a seven month closing high yesterday. european trading, s
gloomy projection for the eurozone. the bank expects the 17-nation economy to contract again in 2013, meaning another year of recession, but there is a glimmer of hope ahead. >> later in 2013, economic activity should gradually recover as global demand strengthens and our accommodative monetary policy stance and significantly improved financial market confidence works its way through the economy. >> the ecb expects muted growth in 2014, and with inflation falling, the bank might be prepared to lower interest rates again next year if it thinks that could help stimulate the battered eurozone economy. >> the latest unemployment figures from france are not encouraging. the french office of -- statistics office says the jobless rate rose to 10.3% in the third quarter of 2012, a 13- year high. youth unemployment remains at a particular problem -- nearly a quarter of adults under the age of 25 are without a job. that is the highest rate since youth unemployment statistics were introduced in 1999. turning to the markets now, that news from the european central bank was not all gloomy. our co
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> woodruff: the economy added more jobs than expected in november, and the unemployment rate dropped to a four year low. good evening, i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the "newshour" tonight, paul solman breaks down the latest report. and we debate the benefits of extending unemployment insurance amid washington's fiscal uncertainty. >> woodruff: then we turn to the supreme court which agreed today to take up the issue of gay marriage. margaret warner looks at what's at stake with marcia coyle of "the national law journal." >> brown: hari sreenivasan reports on the threat to the shellfish industry from coast to coast, as ocean temperatures rise and the waters are more acidic. >> this is a very dramatic change that has not been seen in the worlds oceans for more than 50 million years. >> woodruff: mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> brown: and gwen ifill sits down with michael beschloss, whose recent foray into the twitter-verse has opened up a new way to view history in the digital age
for regional power. israel has the most powerful economy and military, but lacks political power for obvious reasons. turkey has economic and military power, but it also has growing regional clout. egypt is the natural leader of the arab world but it's not in a position to dominate. its economy is shambles, its military is second rate. the public opposition has been reassuring. the middle east is a complex region that is changing fast. grand generalizations about it are likely to be undone by events. but it is a more vibrant, energetic, open, even democratic place than the middle east a generation ago. for more, read my column in this week's "time" magazine. let's get started. >>> it was a week filled with tension and violence in egypt. there were mass protests after morsi issued a decree neutering the judiciary. there were demonstrations in his favor, and a constitution was drafted that spurred protest on the street. what to make of it all? two of my favorite scholars are with me. welcome, guys. conventional wisdom is this is a power grab by morsi. is that accurate? >> his dclaration gave h
, people. i hope you're not either. coming up tomorrow, what was once a dark spot in the economy is becoming the shining star in the recovery. why the quick tu around? that's all for on the. thanks for joining us. have a great night. see you right back here tomorrow. ♪ lew: good evening, everybody. u.s. foreign policy in the middle east in question at this hour. violence spiring outf contro in syria after 20 months of civil unrest and the deas of at least 40,000 murdered civilians at the hands of their own government. united states and nato agreeing to deploy patriot weapons and to thwart an aso-called by assad. the missile systems to be positioned near the syria. his staff denies that and estimates if they were deploy troops, it requires 75,000 of the troops in a full ground invasionn order seize the chemical weapon stockpile. fox news confirming they were not ordered to draft the consideration of such a mission. secretary of state clinton is nonetheless talking very tough calling for assad to step down as the obama administration has done for the past 15 months, b refusing,
than to stay in. won people drop out of the labor force they slow the economy. their productivity is gone, their contributions are no longer there, so this is a different situation we're facing today than we faced i really think since the end of the world war ii. >> brown: before the implication of the fiscal cliff,xplain it because different states have different impact. >> under normal economic times this say program that is governed by state law and administered by the state. and states pay up to 26 weeks of benefits, six months for people who lost jobs through no fault of their own. but if bad economic times historically congress has authorized additional levels of benefits. this time it is a program called the emergency unemployment compensation system. and there are four different tiers depending on how bad your state unemployment rate is every state gets 14 weeks. nine states get up to 47 a decisional weeks. and the rest are in betweenment but you have to be over 9% to get that additional 47 weeks. >> brown: so it is this program that is now caught up in the fiscal cliff ne
over the last four years, there is progress in some key sectors of our economy. we've seen housing finally begin to bounce back for the first time, and that obviously has an enormous ripple affect throughout the economy. consumer confidence is as high as it's been. many of you over the last two, three years have experienced record profits or near record profits and have a lot of money where you're prepared to invest in plants, and equipment, and hire folks. obviously globally the economy is still soft. europe is going to be in the doldrums for quite some time. asia is not charging forward and some of the emerging markets are not charging forward as quickly as they were maybe a few years ago. but i think what all of you recognize and many of you have told me is that everybody is looking to america, because they understand that if we're able to put forward a long-term agenda for growth and prosperity that is broad based here in the united states, that confidence will not just increase here in the united states, it will increase globe balance leave. globally and i think we can get the
that's what he's trying to do. it's hard to see where the upside is for the president if the economy slips into recession, talking about 2013 having no growth would be horrible. >> yeah, so, it's a little hard to see what the game is. as kim was mentioning, the president wants these tax increases. it seems to me we're going to go through this sort of scorpion dance the rest of the year. what did the president campaign on? what was the one thing, i think most people would say he campaigned on, that's raising tax rates on the wealthiest, the two top rates, that's the thing i think is on the table and-- >>, but the republicans put that on the table. >> and the republicans put that on the table the a through deductions and-- >> yeah. but they're willing to put that on the table. the question is, what does the president then give republicans in return, if anything? >> well, i think that's what the republicans position should be. say we have committed what you campaigned on. if you're not willing to talk about reducing spending, they are we're not going to be able to do a deal with you. an
like republicans want? >> here is what is at stake. economy is on the brink potentially of going to recession. that will have the worst impact on the deficit that anything will. we got to make sure that the economy continuebes to grow. that is the problem here. i know democrats have this blood lust to raise taxes on supposedly rich people, which are really small business people. but it is not going to do anything to grow the economy. here is what president obama needs. he has to make sure the economy grows. he will be a two-term jimmy carter if the economy goes back in recession and we can't pull ourselves out of this thing. >> eric: i heard you laugh, martin on the "two-term jimmy carter" line. >> he doesn't want to be a two-term george w. bush that took us in a steep recession. >> hey, you are the one with the bush tax cut. >> this can be worked out. everybody knows that. you can raise rates a point or two, that is not going to be end of the world. republicans understand that. let's get through with the fear we have had a couple of weeks of theater and let's get down to serious
about the importance of preventing a tax increase on middle class families, strengthening our economy, and adopting a balanced approach to deficit reduction. and so it goes. my first guest says it does not matter who you tax or what form revenue takes him, taking more money at the private sector will hurt economic growth. joining us now, republican senator from the great state of kentucky from the senator rand paul. good to have you with us, senator. >> good evening. the president says we don't have enough time for tax reform or in thailand reeorm. you know my responses? we have been talking about this for two years. why haven't we done anything? i met with the president a year-and-a-half ago and i looke@ across the table in. i said in a we need to do something about social security. we need to do something to save medicare. they have done zero. how come there is no committee appear. d'agata washington. who is in charge of social security reform? nobody. everybody waits for a deadline and throws up their hands and says we don't have enough time. it is broken up here, but because they'
? >> i think we'll get a deal. everyone realizes how important it is, our economy is moving up some, not fast enough but some, and to go over the cliff would be terrible. i think we'll get an agreement. the reason i think we'll get an agreement, what's standing in the way is revenues, particularly making that top rate go up to 39.6 but we're seeing real progress in that regard in two ways. first, a good number of republican conservatives, people like colter and crystal, said we have to do it. last week tom coburn said it's preferable, cutting deductions and business leaders who support mitt romney, the head of fedex and at&t saying let it happen. the president won the election on that issue and i think you will see our republican colleagues reluctantly say 39.6. >> let me interrupt and bring in senator corker. senator schumer's right, a growing number much republicans and conservatives, not a majority, but a growing number, are saying we have to cave on tax -- on raising tax rates, not just the idea of closing loopholes. would you accept returning to the clinton rate of 39.6% or wou
.7%. the economy added 146,000 jobs, not great but good. a third of that came from the retail sector. 53,000 jobs added. professional and business services up 43,000. leisure and hospitality up. construction, though, lost 20,000 jobs. we should note that jobs numbers were revise d downward, though, for september and october. in september it was revised from 148,000 gain to 238,000. went from 138,000 to 132,000. this month, the 7.7 is a full point lower than where we were at this time last year. so what are we supposed to make of these numbers and does the november report provide us a real sense of where this recovery is right now? let's bring in the man we like to bring in every month, the chief economist for moody's analytics. mark, i have to start with this sandy impact. the labor department specifically put out a statement saying our survey response rates and the affects ee eed states. it did not affect estimates for november. do you believe that? >> i'm skeptical. i mean, new yorkers worked really hard and got it together gracefully given the circumstances. i suspect when we get all the data
the kinds of revenue from the wealthiest americans to help the economy grow and achieve deficit reduction and this puts us on a path towards a better economy. >> [inaudible question] what will he do at this moment? >> i would simply redirect that question to the republican leaders, who to this day, have not put forward any proposal on how they would achieve revenues and address the issue on the top 2%. there is no other way to do it, there is no other mathematically sound way to do it. making vague promises about achieving revenue through capping deductions were closing loopholes, it simply doesn't add up to a serious proposal. we haven't heard which deductions they would cap or which loopholes they were close. what is true is that other proposals that have been put forward include attempts to raise revenue only through closing loopholes and limited deductions can only achieve this if the middle class gets stuck with the bill. or if you have a proposal that is wildly limply unfeasible because it suggests that we would wipe out charitable deductions. it is simply impossible and getting som
's not in a position to dominate. its economy is shambles, it's i it's military is second rate. the public opposition has bng reassuring. the middle east is a complex region that is changing fast. it's more vibrant and even more democratic place of the middle east a generation ago. you can read my column in this week's time magazine. let's get started. >>> it was a week filled with tension and violence in egypt. there were mass protests after morsi issued a decree neutering the agenda. what to make of it all? two of my favorite scholars are with me. this is a power grab my morsi. is that accurate? >> every decision he makes is now free of any possibility of judicial review. really the game is kind of moved beyond that now. what is motivating people to protest is not the declaration but it's the new institution that his allies have rushed through. >> steve, what is the army's role in all of this. that's the piece people don't understand. you have morsi and the isz lam brother head. you have the liberals who are opposing it. where does the army stand? >> the military has removed itself from the politic
." and brian beutler and eric bates. what's your take on this? how severe will the harm be to the economy if we do not have a deal by december 31st. >> the macroeconomic harm is not going to be that great. our economy is adaptable adjustable. these things take place over the course of a year. for some people it is a cliff. the payroll tax cut will expire. if you're a working person, you're losing $40 to $50 a week immediately in your first paycheck. the unemployment benefits will expire. if you're dependent on that, your income will fall off the cliff. if you're someone who listens on dividends and financial gains, the fact that tax on those will rise will not put a crimp in your lifestyle and you may not be taking any capital gains until june, july, august, september. those who are most vulnerable are those on the lower income ladder and who are benefiting from the benefits that will expire, they will feel like they're going over a cliff. >> eliot: brian, let me turn to you, politically am i not correct? the pieces of the tax impact that dan was just talking about that would have the greatest
of the biggest thing is that is killing the economy is something so big you got to say to yourself how come they can't take a little bit less to back up on its seat? >> guest: i am going to disagree with you a little bit. if you look at the percentage of investment, the exploration production of energy is very heavily involved, it is a very expensive item, and their profits are five to 8% on what they actually invest. microsoft and intel are much more profitable and they pay less in taxes than the percentage of the total revenue. so, people always focus on the gas prices. look at your heating bill. the natural gas movement brought down the price of natural gas about 80% of what we produce in terms of my state. it's about a quarter of what it was three years ago. that isn't always a good deal for the american people. it's actually bringing the industry back. this industry which is often vilified quite frankly is the one that is generating more jobs, more income, more opportunity than almost any other sector and it isn't as profitable as the high-tech. >> host: nelson in colorado springs. >>
. that way congress couldn't blow up the world economy for no good reason. it's taking the sharp knife covered in explosives away from a kid who has a lot of temper tantrums. it's a good thing to do. the white house calls it the mcconnell plan because it's based on an idea that mitch mcconnell proposed become in july 2011. but even though it is mitch mcconnell's idea, even though he came up with it, mitch mcconnell is not for it. mitch mcconnell at this point does not support the mcconnell plan at all. he didn't think democrats did either. and yesterday he wanted to call their bluff. now that is when c-span 2 suddenly became amazing television. yesterday afternoon mitch mcconnell asked the senate to move to an immediate vote on the mcconnell plan. vote on it now. you figured harry reid would back down. prove that even democrats don't like this idea. but reid did not back down. he doubled down. he said, yeah, let's vote on the plan. but let's move to an immediate up or down vote. no filibuster, no 60-vote requirement, let's see if it gets 51. if so, it's passed. at which point, mcconnel
economy. >> they could play havoc with the world economy. i think you would see a wave of terror across the region, potentially even here at home. i don't think, just for your personal, as per personal opinion, i don't think they would try to block the persian gulf because that would cut their own throats, but i would not be surprised to see them attack the oil facilities of other countries on the periphery of the gulf. and to do other things that would drive the price of oil through the roof but i think -- and i think you would see them behave in a very different way in both iraq and afghanistan. >> rose: based on everything you know, do you believe that they will respond to the economic embargo, the economic sanctions if we turn that screw as hard as we possibly can? >> i don't think the government will, if there is one thing that the iranians, saddam hussein, the north koreans and bashar al-assad all have in common is they don't care how many other people get killed. >> rose: even their own people? >> it is what happens to them that matters. so the question is, do those, can the sanc
about is 350,000 americans in this report alone. a really staggering the state of our economy now. here's a bit more for the labor report. 12 million americans still unemployed. about 40% of them have been out of work for 27 weeks or longer. more than eight million americans only working part time due to the current state of the economy. martha: new comments about the crisis in syria coming from secretary of state hillary clinton. the u.s. and other nations fear that the syrian regime could use chemical weapons against its own people. secretary clinton making it very clear that syrian president bashar al-assad must go. >> let me also be absolutely clear. the united states stands with the syrian people in insisting that any transition process result in a unified, democratic syria. in which all citizens are represented. sunni, alawite, christians, kurds, men, women, every syrian must be included in this process for a new and better future. martha: still far from where we are right now in the country of syria where 45,000 people have been killed under the assad regime. president, secretary
is a grand bargain to deal with the terrible state of our economy, we're fiscally bankrupt, we didn't have the dollar, we might be greece, we have got to deal with our debt bomb, we have got to face the fiscal cliff that's coming in a couple of weeks. >> so you know what both sides are saying? the president is saying there's no way to make the math work. without raising the rates for the top income earners and that the republicans should give on this. >> yeah. >> do you think he's right? >> well, i understand that position, that was the position he took during the campaign. but what has to happen in my view, you've got to have everything on the table, you have to have revenue increases. now how you get those to revenue increases was an item of discussion during the campaign, and it's an item more negotiation, i for one think you can get there by eliminating and broadeninging the tax base which eliminating loopholes and deductions. the truth of the matter is that we're not undertaxed as americans, we overspend. i think everything would agree that we overspend that's why we have this debt to
think everyone realizes how important it is. our economy is moving up some, not fast enough but, some, and to go over the cliff would be terrible. i think we will get an agreement. and, the reason i think we'll get an agreement, what is standing in the way, is revenues, particularly making that top rate go up to 39-6 but i think we are seeing real progress in that regard in two days. first, a good number of republican conservatives, people like coulter and bill kristol said we have to do it and, tom coburn says, in terms of the deduction and, mitt romney and the republicans and head of fedex and at&t saying, let it happen. so i think that is likely to happen. the president won the election on that issue and i think you'll see our republican colleagues reluctantly say, okay. let's go up to 39.6. >> chris: senator, let me interrupt right there and bring in senator corker. senator schumer is exactly right. a growing number of republicans and conservative, not a majority but a growing number are saying, look, we have to cave on tax -- raising tax rates, not just the idea of closing loopho
in this country. theit has done nothing to stimulate jobs. it has done nothing to take our economy into a better shape. it was the bush tax cuts and the wars that drove us into this huge deficit that we have now. not the republicans' entitlements for this country and then we have neglected this country and the people of this country. we could have created jobs 10 times over. you have vets that are going to be coming back here, and where are the jobs for them? we have focused so much on these wars we got quagmired into, obama has been trying to get us out of them for the last four years. all the republicans have done for the last four years is say no, no, no to any kind of -- and obama has tried to push through bills to cut taxes for job creators, fo. host: for small businesses? caller: yes, for small businesses. host: here is reaction from senator lindsey gramm. he says this -- a republican from new jersey, go ahead. caller: i am calling in reference to this fiscal cliff. at this point, all the seniors are already in trouble. they are not going to get but a little increase. congress will automat
a trillion dollars next year, there is more and more money on the sidelines in this economy. which means there are even more jobs that won't get created. that means economic growth will even decrease more. so, the president's got to wake up an realize he owns this economy. it is not in his political benefit to do this brinkmanship. jon: debbie, my understanding that the most to everybody agrees that the big drivers of government spending are entitlement programs like social security and medicare and medicaid. why not talk about reducing the expenditures there somehow? >> i want to say several things. one of the things got to do stop taking cheap shots. the secretary of treasury is one of the most serious people in this government. has the trust of the president and that is who the president is sending in here. let's stop taking these cheap shots. that is the kind of stuff we have to stop doing. you are right, this uncertainty is hurting the economy and putting money on the sideline, why we have to solve it. we need to walk into a room and put everything on the table. social security and
. whether it's the best solutioner to the economy is an entirely different story. this is a political and ideological argument and we'll see who wins. martha: there is a couple ways this could go. one is to land in the middle. you have $800 billion and $1.6 trillion. the other is for one side to say no deal. we'll let you go over the fiscal cliff and we'll see what happens. >> reporter: at the last minute i think there will be a deal. i think republicans will retreat and say okay, you can have higher tax rates but only on people making a half million dollars a year. the president will say, okay, but we'll only discuss -- we'll think about, we'll promise spending cuts in the future. it will be a way of kicking the can down the road. martha: charles krauthammer have a will the more leverage than republicans realize. the president does not want us to go into a recession. we'll talk about that coming up. bill: democrats are all about tax hike and republicans argue massive spending programs like medicare and social security must be dealt with in any kind of deal if you want to bring count
a commitment he made to the american people. he's doing something that he thinks will hurt the american economy, $800 million of tax on job creators, he's splitting his party, he's demoralizing his base and he's doing this to try to cut a deal that he can't in his heart really believe in. >> is it not better to at least try to come to sort of -- come off a little bit. but the president, by changing his goalpost, because first he said it was $800 billion when he was running for office, now it's 1.6, then the president said he wants to have a credit card with no limits in terms of the debt ceiling and the president looks as the term you used is arrogant. i think the president has a grudge because speaker boehner has said you want to get $800 billion from the rich. let me get $800 billion from the rich but instead of raising the tax rate, let me get $800 billion. the same people, the same amount, but i'll get them differently through closing loopholes and getting rid of some deductions. and the president, the white house said no i think because the president wants to rub his nose in it and extract
that this is a self-inflicted wound on our economy, you're exactly right, our current policy. we're educating brilliant students and then compelling them to go to work in shanghai or singapore rather than san antonio or the silicon valley. meanwhile, we're handing out tens of thousands of diversity visas to immigrants chosen by a random lottery, without regard to any qualifications they might when it comes to job creation and entrepreneurship. it makes absolutely no sense. i believe we need an immigration policy that serves our national interest. and if there's one thing that we need more than anything else now is we need job creators and entrepreneurs in the united states. and we know in the -- in the global economy, it's people with the special skills in science, technology, engineering and mathematics are the ones that are going to help us create jobs and grow the economy. not just for these individuals, but for the people that are hired by the start-up businesses that they will create. the stem jobs act would mitigate the problem with the diversity lottery visa which, again, does not dist
it differently, they should tell us how they want to do it. >> i believe raising tax rates hurts our economy, hurts the prospects for more jobs in our country. >> shannon: as the sparring continues over the fiscal cliff, neither boehner nor geithner can say for certain that the country will not go over the edge. i'm shannon bream. america's news headquarters live from the nation's capital starts right now. >> shannon: we want to get to the budget standoff. peter doocy joins us live. there is time to strike a deal but not a lot. >> reporter: that's right. the speaker of the house john boehner made a point today to say there is not much time between election day and the end of the year. he thinks the white house has already wasted weeks because he does not think the proposal to avoid a fiscal cliff is serious one. negotiations here are nowhere. another republican, senator lindsey graham thinks he thinks things are heading down hill. >> i think we are going over the cliff. it's clear to me they made a political calculation. the offer doesn't deal with the entitlement reform to save the medicare
'll be impacted, won't be able to put more money into the economy, won't be able to help turn the economy around. so that really is sort of the big sticking point. the white house refusing to budge from it at this point. we'll see where it goes in the next coming days. >> topic two, that is that the president is meeting with the leaders of the national governors association. i have the lineup here. a lot of people haven't heard of some of those folks. jack markell, dayton, beebe, gary her bet of utah, mary fallin of oklahoma and wisconsin's goff scott walker who i think a lot of people are familiar with. the question is why are they there, what do they want and why wh -- what do they want to say? >> a lot of reasons. the president wants to make his case to them, and then in turn hopefully that they will go up on capitol hill. of course, some of them will be meeting with house speaker john boehner and senate majority leader harry reid. so the hope is they will put pressure on their lawmakers from their states to get a deal done. but also this is a chance for these governors to talk about the fact
. cliffhanger. i don't know. if the economy falls in the forest and no one is here to hear it is there a sound. yesterday the republicans blame the democrats and the democrats blame the republicans. john had a exclusive with chris wallace. >> brian: chris wallace sat down with jone boehner. >> steve: here is mr. boehner describing the impression at the moment of what tim geithner was trying to sell him. >> i was ghasted and i looked at him and said you can't be serious. i never seen like it we have 7 weeks before election day andepped of the year. three of those weeks are wasted with this nonsense. >> y are talking about roughly. timothy depite gite saying we'll raise taxes 1.6 trillion and washington will increase taxes on capitol gains and we would like to say we like the power to raise the debt ceiling any time we want for the executive branch which is unconstitutional. >> steve: it is not 39 or 35 percent. all nonstarters in the world of negotiation. >> gretchen: two things to discuss. why is it tim geithner doing the discussions inted of the president of the united states. let me know if
of this country's economy. and actually, things are looking up, if you look at -- >> they're not saying that. >> -- the data. >> they're not saying that. i'm saying small business owners will be hurt. >> yeah. >> if you raise taxes. but -- we're talking about compromise. this is my view. you've got your view. you know what the answer is? >> yeah. >> getting together and talking saying, listen, this is what i can live with. you know what? 39.6% is offensive, even raising it 1 percentage point is offensive. why don't we do what warren buffett says and anybody that makes $1 million or more pays 30%, a minimum tax rate of 30%. and you raise the level up to $500,000 instead of $250,000 and i'll go ahead and reluctantly agree to raise the top rate to 37%. that's how deals are done, but you never get there if you don't have a president and congress -- >> but they can't do that now. >> why can't they do that? >> it's the centerpiece of their argument since the campaign and tim geithner on the sunday shows. they say there is no deal about raising taxes on the wealthy. >> and they're right. the matter
business with key sectors in the iranian economy, with energy and shipbuilding and shipping and ports, this amendment that would shut down businesses that are involved in sectors which fund the proliferation activities of iran, of that regime, is crucial. in addition, the amendment is going to prohibit business with all designated persons connected to the iranian government. it bans trade and commodities used, it is designed to stop iran from busting sanctions by receiving payment in gold or using oil payments in local currency to buy gold. we have got to stop an effort to water down these sanctions. i say that because i remember the votes in the past, i remember our effort on the central bank. it was only because we got unanimous votes because we got so much sport that we were able to deploy those. let me add there's another portion of the amendments here that targets the regime for their human rights abuses and i think one of the areas where we have really been short, for those of you who talked to those who have been in the prisons, who have experienced the torture, seen the murder
billion slashed from domestic programs. an estimated 2 million jobs could be lost pushing the economy back into a recession adding to the misery to those facing tough times by ending jobless benefits for the long term unemployed. steve is live in washington. where do we stand at this point? >> reporter: two sides did do something today. they appeared on the sunday talk shows but they haven't negotiated an actual deal. john boehner blasted the white house plan which was put forward last week. boehner says the president essentially wasted the last three weeks since the election with nonsense. >> the president is asking for $1.6 trillion worth of new revenue over ten years, twice as much as he been asking for in public. stimulus spending that exceeded the amount of new cuts he was willing to consider. it was not a serious offer. >> reporter: and boehner says he was flabbergasted when he was given the proposal. >> heather: and democrats are defending themselves? >> treasury-secretary tim geithner on fox news defending the president's plan for raising revenues, cutting spending and reduce the d
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